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Ranking Law Schools By Federal Judicial Clerkships

US News & World Report sheds some light on what law school graduates get the nicest Federal judicial clerkships.  Not many surprises here.  Yale ranked #1, followed by The University of North Dakota, Stanford and Harvard.

New Law School Ranking: Judicial Clerkship Jobs
by Robert Morse

Behind every great judge is his or her law clerk. Judicial clerkships are considered very prestigious. However, they are very difficult to obtain because they are highly coveted by law school graduates. Federal clerkships are considered the most prestigious, making them that much harder to get.

With this in mind U.S. News has just published our first-ever ranking of which law schools are sending the largest proportions of their graduates on to judicial clerkships for federal judges. The ranking is sorted by the percentage of the 2007 J.D. graduating class that was employed as clerks by federal judges. Yale, not surprisingly, came out No. 1.

Since they give clerks considerable knowledge of the law and court system, clerkships can provide a significant edge in today’s very competitive legal job market. In addition, some clerks are more highly prized by potential employers because of the valuable contacts that they develop during their clerkships.

What do clerks do? According the Indiana University Guide to Judicial Clerkships:

“The judicial clerk is a full-time assistant to the judge and usually performs a wide range of tasks including, legal research, drafting of memoranda and court opinions, proofreading and cite checking. A judicial clerk is often responsible for various administrative tasks such as maintenance of the docket and library, assembling documents or other administrative tasks necessary to meet the many obligations of the judge.”

Check out the chart of the new rankings here.


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